https://penntoday.upenn.edu/news/state-us-democracy (Image: Ted Eytan)

I’ve taken a break from writing recently, in lieu of the events on January 6th. Due to the gravity of it all, I just couldn’t find the words.

Now, as our former president’s impeachment case sits in the hands of our Senate representatives, I cannot sit in silence anymore. I have to find the words.

Former President Trump incited a mob on national television for us all to witness —

If there was any question about whether or not Donald Trump incited the attack on January 6th, that was put to rest by the House Managers this week. To list just a few, PBS, ABC, and NYT covered the trial live for anyone to watch…


Number Twelve — Overworked and underpaid teachers

Photo by Ben White on Unsplash

This article follows from an article I published last week, titled “Twelve Indictments of the U.S Education System: Number Eleven — Redlining and Racism,” where I discussed the eleventh of twelve indictments. Here is the final indictment.

The fact of the matter is that we do not pay our teachers enough. They have a 24-hour job working with our children — our future — and they should not need a part-time job on top of this in order to afford to live. We overwork them and underpay them. That’s why we keep losing them.

Cost of Living —

The cost of living is made…


Number Eleven— Redlining and Racism

Photo by Taylor Wilcox on Unsplash

This article follows from an article I published last week, titled “Twelve Indictments of the U.S Education System: Number Ten — Magnet Schools,” where I discussed the tenth of twelve indictments. Here is the eleventh.

My graduating class consisted of 360 caucasian kids and 5 kids of different races and ethnicities. People from my hometown say affectionately that they are from “marshmallow land” because our caucasian population is overwhelming to any other race, 23,436 people in my school district, and 94% of them were white.

Alternatively, on a trip to Chicago, I visited a summer school for high-risk kids with…


Number Ten—Magnet Schools

Photo by CDC on Unsplash

This article follows on from an article I published last week titled “Twelve Indictments of the U.S Education System: Number Nine — Abolition of specials,” where I discussed the ninth of twelve indictments. Here is the tenth.

As a society, we have attached a negative connotation to vocational schools. The general population has agreed that school is something we all must bear through regardless of our interest, enjoyment, or success. We see education as a means to an end. Our children spend one hundred and eighty days a year in school for an average of 6.64 hours a day. Meaning…


Number Nine — Abolition of specials

Photo by Atikah Akhtar on Unsplash

This article follows on from an article I published last week, titled “Twelve Indictments of the U.S Education System: Number Eight — Lack of political training,” where I discussed the eighth of twelve indictments. Here is the ninth.

As time goes on, the classes we’ve deemed “specials” in schools are being cut. Art, music, gym, theater, recess, all of the “fluff” as some call it. Anything that isn’t a core subject is being thrown to the wayside, but those courses are where our students thrive. It’s where they find the things they like to do. It is the exploration they…


What is it? How does it work? And what is it like to have it?

Photo by Ali Inay on Unsplash

The gluten-free diet has been getting a lot of attention recently. Some of this attention has been positive, some negative, some accurate, and some inaccurate. So, as a person with Celiac Disease, living the gluten-free life, I wanted to break down what it all means and what it is like to live this way. Because I have Celiac Disease, I will focus on that diagnosis, but I will touch on the others.

Celiac Disease v. Gluten Allergy v. the Fad Diet

Gluten is an umbrella term for a collection of grains that some individuals…


Number Eight — Lack of political and democratic training

Photo by Element5 Digital on Unsplash

This article follows on from an article I published last week, titled “Twelve Indictments of the U.S Education System: Number Seven — Lack of life training,” where I discussed the seventh of twelve indictments. Here is the eighth.

An important part of being an adult is being politically involved. However, most either do not participate, or they are participating in an uninformed fashion. This past election season alone has been perfect proof of that. I have had to show countless friends, coworkers, and acquaintances how to find their voting booths, how to find out who’s on their ballot, and how…


Number Seven — Lack of life training

Photo by Anubhav Saxena on Unsplash

This article follows on from an article I published last week titled “Twelve Indictments of the U.S Education System: Number Six — Lack of social/emotional learning,” where I discussed the sixth of twelve indictments. Here is the seventh.

Education in the United States requires you to be in school until you are eighteen years old, but does not give you the skills and training needed to live in the world as an adult. We are so focused on teaching our kids the Pythagorean Theorem that we forget to teach them about taxes. …


Number Six — Lack of social/emotional learning

Photo by Priscilla Du Preez on Unsplash

This article follows on from an article I published last week, titled “Twelve Indictments of the U.S Education System: Number Five — Stifling of teacher’s creativity and growth”, where I discussed the fifth of twelve indictments, here is the sixth.

An important part of being a functioning adult in society is understanding and working through social situations and your own emotions. However, there is little to no focus on mental/emotional and social health in schools. …


Photo by Pigoff PhotographY on Unsplash

I find myself nostalgic for early mornings in the winter

When it was still dark outside, and so cold my cheeks would turn pink just from the walk outside

Because there was a time when I was outside during early mornings in the winter

There was a time when I didn’t set an alarm because someone else was always my alarm clock

When I didn’t worry about school shootings, abortion rights, women’s rights, LBGTQ rights, political corruption, or COVID-19

I didn’t stress about my country and the people in it so hard that I had to stop watching, stop participating

Teagan King

UW-Green Bay graduate with a major in Political Science and Democracy and Justice Studies. Focused on political writing.

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